How to Use the Cricut EasyPress for Perfect Results

How to Use the Cricut EasyPress for Perfect Results

Is it safe to say that you are prepared for a showdown? We should prepare for the iron-on rumble! Today we’re talking iron-on vinyl and how to secure it to a base material; for example, a shirt. To activate the glue of an iron-on vinyl, you need warmth and lots of it! I know of three distinct warming strategies: a family iron, an expert warming press, and the Cricut EasyPress!

I’ve been needing to write a comparison section about these three techniques for quite a while, since I get a lot of questions regarding using iron-on vinyl. With such a huge number of options on the market these days, it tends to be overwhelming attempting to choose which warming technique is correct for you! I finally got a heat press, so now we can get down to business and discover which heat source dominates the competition and the upsides and downsides of each, so you can make an educated decision.

For this test, I made a shirt using three sorts of iron-on vinyl (standard mint iron-on, pink foil iron-on, and gold sparkle iron-on) with the three heating methods. Remember that the foil iron-on is a cool strip. I pre-washed the shirt many, many times. Every time I did a load of clothing, this shirt got tossed in. We’ll see how well each warmth source and iron-on type held up! Now, how about we investigate the present contenders and how they fared in our battle!

 

The Household Iron

I’m using my Black & Decker, which I’ve had for many years. It’s a mid-tier iron, not all that much yet but not excessively modest. I set it to the “Cotton” setting and ensured that the water tank wasn’t filled, so there was no steam. The normal iron-on vinyl fared okay, and the sparkle did extraordinarily. The foil though… well, that was horrible. My iron probably overheated, but it’s difficult to tell how hot it was, since there are no real temperature settings. The foil tragically melted and bubbled. You can see the smoother result from the warmth press to one side.

Pros:

  • It’s multi-purpose: you can make iron-on shirts and iron some clothes.
  • It’s lightweight.
  • It’s not hard to store.
  • You can move it over surfaces that aren’t exceptionally level, like caps.
  • It’s an economical purchase.

Cons:

  • There’s no real way to set a specific temperature, so it’s frequently a guessing game to get the correct setting.
  • It can have hot and cold spots, which may cause your iron-on to rise in certain spots and not others.
  • It regularly takes more time than the other techniques.
  • It may require extra presses because the first press wasn’t adequate.
  • The longevity of the iron-on is regularly shorter than when heated by the other methods.

 

The Heat Press

For this test, I’m using the Co-Z 5-in-1 Swing-Arm Heat Press. It was sent to me by Cricut with the express purpose of this experiment. I’ve needed to test one for some time, so I was very eager to give it a shot. When it arrived at my home though (all 40lbs of it), I found it to be very scary. There was the press itself, as well as suplemental items. It took me some time to make sense of how to use it, as the guidelines were entertainingly non-instructional. (For what reason does SP = temperature? I have no clue.)

Each of the three kinds of iron-on fared well with a single 20-second press at 295°. I use the heat-safe tape that accompanied the press to keep everything set up and I loved it!

Pros:

  • It presses vinyl delightfully and effectively (once I got the hang of it).
  • It has even warmth conveyance over the plates.
  • You can set the temperature and time to get the ideal press.
  • It remembers your last-used temperature.
  • You can leave during the pressing time. It’s typically under 30 seconds, but that may be sufficient opportunity for you to clean up a piece or check Facebook.
  • It includes a few additional items for doing non-level things, like mugs, caps, and plates.

Cons:

  • Though it wasn’t hard to use, I thought that it was intimidating right out of the container.
  • The lack of guidelines was baffling.
  • It’s enormous and unbalanced. It occupies a huge area in my specialty room and doesn’t store effectively by any stretch of the imagination. (I can’t simply conceal it under my work table, for instance.)
  • The time it takes to warm up is longer than the iron or the EasyPress — it takes just about 7 minutes to find a good temperature.
  • It’s ungainly to do projects bigger than the size of the squeezing plates.
  • It’s cost-prohibitive for some people.
  • I realize this shouldn’t make any difference, but it’s not the most alluring piece of hardware.